“Leading papers” at the School of Science and Engineering

Excited to see our recent paper on the demonstration of nanoscale room temperature (R.T.) sub-100nm chiral skyrmions, with the Paul Scherrer Institut and CNRS/Thales, ( Nature Nanotechnology. 11, 444–448 (2016) ) selected as a leading paper. The selection highlights papers from across the University of Manchester’s Faculty of Science and Engineering. The highlight describes the discovery of room temperature individual nanoscale chiral skyrmions by means of high resolution X-ray imaging. The research was performed in the context of the MAGicSky EU research project and this observation can enable further fundamental studies on the very rich physics of skyrmions as well as serve as a basis for the development of skyrmion-based memory and logic devices.

Skyrmion_Racetrack

Skyrmion-based magnetic memory concept. 

Web of Science “Highly Cited Paper”

Web of Science now ranks our recent paper with the Paul Scherrer Institut and CNRS/Thales on nanoscale room temperature (R.T.) sub-100nm chiral skyrmions ( Nat. Nanotech. 11, 444–448 (2016) ) as a “Highly Cited Paper” and a “Hot Paper”. The paper describes the discovery of room temperature individual nanoscale chiral skyrmions by means of high resolution X-ray imaging. The research was performed in the context of the MAGicSky EU research project. This observation can serve as a basis for the development of skyrmion-based memory and logic devices and enable further fundamental studies on the very rich physics of skyrmions.

What are magnetic skyrmions?

The MAGicSky consortium just published online an informative brief overview on “The history and future of skyrmions within MAGicSky“. Find out about skyrmions, what they are, their basic properties and their history, as well as how they can be used to revolutionise the data storage industry. MAGicSky is a Horizon 2020 European Framework Programme for Research and Innovation project that started in September 2015 and will run for three years.

Manchester rises up the ranks

The University of Manchester is now 35th in the world, a rise from 41st in 2015, according to the 2016 Academic Ranking of World Universities – often known as the Shanghai ranking. In September, Manchester was also placed 33rd the world according to the QS World Universities rankings. The continuous rise is largely attributed to an increase in the number of its highly-cited researchers and the University’s leading research profile.